The Power of Language – Relooking the History of Disability-Related Terminology

By Satyajit Amin

In 1835, the French astronomer Adolphe Quetelet published an essay entitled “L’Homme Moyen” (the average man). In it, Quetelet used statistical techniques to analyse the similarities in the biological and social natures of man. This systematic approach was novel, and allowed for a portrait of society to be painted in patterns of averages. Quetelet argued that the traits most commonly represented in humanity were the ones that were ‘normal’— those who deviated from this set were not. This marriage of mathematical analysis and scientific study yielded many offspring: The development of the Body Mass Index (BMI), for example, was one fruitful outcome. Quetelet’s essay, however, also had a more dubious consequence. In the natural sciences, statistical abnormalities are scorned and disregarded. They can be disruptive drains on resources, and have no real value. But this rational enmity takes on an altogether different complexion when the ‘abnormalities’ have names, faces, and identities. Read more

Media Reporting on Child Sexual Abuse

By Bhumika Sahani

Upholding the principles of its role as the fourth pillar of democracy, the media has a responsibility to bring the issue of child sexual abuse into the realm of public debate. It is integral that the issue gets highlighted, is given due attention and recognized by masses as a gruesome offence against children.

Albeit the responsibility bestowed upon the media, it is saddening to see the sensationalisation that the media at large is engaging in instead of sensitive reporting, as is expected of it. Read more

Going Beyond the Doing

Article contributed by Ranjani Seetharaman

I believe that the presence of unconditional love in childhood is what shapes an individual’s future. It is key to the development of a healthy sense of self which includes self-confidence, self-respect and self-worth. I can go as far as to say that it is the right of every child to receive unconditional love. Unconditional love simply refers to having no conditions to be loved, accepted and respected. It is essentially separating the child from what he/she does. Read more

POCSO Act, its Implications and Challenges

-Kushi Kushallapa

The 2007 National Study on Child Abuse by the Ministry of Women and Child Development reported that over 53% Indian
children are victims of some form of sexual abuse or the other, ranging from penetrative sexual assault to various forms of non-contact sexual abuse.

This Study set the ball rolling to have a separate legislation for sexual crimes against children and the Protection of Children from Sexual Offences (POCSO) Act was passed in 2012. Read more

“Safe and Unsafe Touch” not “Good and Bad Touch” Why?

Clearly describing Personal Body Safety rules involves helping children develop the capacity to recognize, resist (to the extent possible) and report sexual abuse.Through one’s experience, Enfold has often come across individuals who communicate the Touching Rule using the words “good and bad”, when helping children learn personal safety rules. Read more

Mass molestation – How does this end?

The recent molestation in Bengaluru on New Year Eve has rightly created a big uproar in the media. However, the highlight of the discussions have been circling around what happened and how it could have been avoided, with a short term focus. Does this address the core issue – which is lack of ability of adults in our society to discuss sexuality, responsibility and personal safety with children, adolescents and young people? Its time we move from band – aid type problem based solutions to lasting interventions and methods that address the core lacunae. How do we do this? Where do we start? Read more

Talking about Safe and Unsafe Touch

Child sexual abuse (CSA) is very common both in India as well as worldwide. Parents can help in fighting this menace by learning about all aspects of CSA – how it happens, why it happens, why the child does not tell, what you can do if you find out about it, how to support the child and what to do about the perpetrator. A small scenario here gives us a brief idea of how to have this conversation with children. For more information do reach out to us. Read more